En Garde: Texas Lifts Knife Restrictions

“En garde”, a common phrase heard in action-packed movies moments before rivals begin their battle. Typically this is when the scene highlights the sword or dagger about to be used for an ultimate fight between the good guy and the bad guy. The state of Texas, now has a bill to make all sword lovers happy, allowing them to openly carry a knife with a blade longer than 5.5 inches. Whether you’re a fan of Medieval times with a sword at hand or you’ve dreamt of recreating epic scenes from Lord of the Rings, on September 1rst, you will be able to openly carry your swords.

 

What the Bill Covers

 

Governor Greg Abbott of Texas signed the bill which removed former knife restrictions and will go into effect on September 1, 2017. Prior to this bill, Texans had the ability to purchase knives longer than 5.5 inches but were not allowed to carry them (unless it fell under the limited exceptions).

 

Swords, spears, daggers, dirks and other items that constitute as knives are now allowed in public if they’re over the standard length of 5.5 inches. One major reason former knife restrictions were fought to be lifted is because anyone with a knife over said length was viewed as a criminal.

 

Texans are saying this is a “freeing” bill which many are excited to be passed. Legally, Texans were allowed to purchase and own knives over 5.5 inches but were not allowed to carry it and would be labeled a criminal if they were found with it.

 

Texas is not the only state to uplift its ban on carrying swords at such lengths. Both Montana and Oklahoma join Texas in allowing their citizens to carry. These “Knife Rights” allow more freedom for all three states.

Why Texans Shouldn’t Worry

 

Although this law allows knife owners to carry their knives, there are some places in which this law doesn’t apply – meaning they won’t be able to carry them at specific places. Exceptions to the law means that you won’t be able to carry open knives in hospitals, schools, places of worship, prisons, government buildings, amusement parks and even bars.

 

Additionally to make citizens feel safer, if a business owner or worker feels uncomfortable with a 5.5 inch or longer knife in their business, they can ask the knife owner to kindly leave.

 

Housing in Texas may seem like it’s on the rise, however the overall cost of living is currently one of the cheapest in all of America. Texans shouldn’t fear the world of Knife Rights making their way to the Lone Star State. Right now, Texas is a great place to live.