After the devastation of Hurricane Harvey, how could any of Houston’s local residents think about anything but the mass destruction? The Cincinnati Bengals saw the despair and lost hope in the survivor’s eyes, and so, they teamed up with the Red Cross to help them out. They even did this knowing they were about to try to crush Houston’s own Houston Texans Thursday, September 14, 2017.

 

This game in took place on the Bengals home turf at Paul Brown Stadium.  Between the Bengals and the Red Cross, they recruited about 60 volunteers to collect cash donations as fans poured in. These collections piled into white, cylindrical buckets with the Red Cross logo on them and, simply stated, “Disaster Relief.”

 

With 60,000 people in attendance, Patricia Smitson, Regional CEO at the American Red Cross Greater Cincinnati-Dayton Region, hoped that the kindness of people’s hearts would shine through in supporting their disaster relief efforts.

 

To make an even deeper impact, all the net proceeds from sports fans buying tickets for the game was willingly donated by the Bengals to the Red Cross. This team and its fans felt sorrow in their hearts for their opposing team’s treacherous losses. In the parking lot during tailgating hours, Bengals fans were more than willing to share warm thoughts and kindness on the air about the opposing team’s fans. Unlike other sports games, where fans from different teams boo and mess with each other, this game was a time for all the fans, regardless of who they supported, to come together and simply enjoy a nice evening out.

 

Coincidentally, a company named DXP Enterprises, which has offices in Houston and Cincinnati, flew some of their employees in Texas to their Illinois office for the game. They knew these people needed time to escape the chaos, which still remains in Houston, and DXP Enterprises was honored to have the opportunity to provide for their employees needs.

 

One woman, Deanna Lopez, from Katy, Texas was sent by DXP on this welcomed trip.  She shared with WKRC Cincinnati Local 12, teary-eyed, “You just don’t know how much it means . . . there’s no words for the break. It just gets you away and it’s nice.”